“Now Joseph had been taken down to Egypt. Potiphar, an Egyptian who was one of Pharaoh’s officials, the captain of the guard, bought him from the Ishmaelites who had taken him there.The Lord was with Joseph so that he prospered, and he lived in the house of his Egyptian master. When his master saw that the Lord was with him and that the Lord gave him success in everything he did, Joseph found favour in his eyes and became his attendant. Potiphar put him in charge of his household, and he entrusted to his care everything he owned. From the time he put him in charge of his household and of all that he owned, the Lordblessed the household of the Egyptian because of Joseph. The blessing of the Lord was on everything Potiphar had, both in the house and in the field. So Potiphar left everything he had in Joseph’s care; with Joseph in charge, he did not concern himself with anything except the food he ate.Now Joseph was well-built and handsome,” NIV

“…his Egyptian master” (2).

While it seems true that Joseph landed on his feet, let’s not forget that he was a servant (a slave even) in a foreign land. It certainly appears he had many benefits, living in the home of this eminent man. But for all that he was in a privileged position, he carried enormous responsibilities. He had to work hard, and I’m sure his hours were not 9 to 5!

“Potiphar put him in charge of his household, and he entrusted to his care everything he owned” (4b);

“So Potiphar left everything he had in Joseph’s care; with Joseph in charge, he did not concern himself with anything except the food he ate” (6).

So Joseph had quite a workload did he not?

Therefore, it is worth considering these words:

‘Joseph’s life demonstrates many principles of Christian service; indeed, Joseph serves as a model for all of us. We have seen him start out in life as a cocky, spoiled young lad, the favourite of his father. If God was going to use Joseph, He first needed to humble him; and being sold into slavery by one’s brothers is quite a dramatic form of humbling (1 Peter 5:6).

Next we see Joseph being faithful in small things – the duties of a lowly slave. Then we see him elevated to greater and greater responsibilities. Some of us would like to become rulers without first being servants, but that is not God’s way (Matthew 5:21).’ Tom Hale: ‘The Applied Old Testament Commentary’, p.187.